July 02, 2013

Training to recognize, treat and prevent hypoxia: a silent killer

Posted: July 02, 2013
ASU's College of Technology and Innovation is one of two colleges in the United States that offers altitude chamber training courses related to recognition, treatment, and prevention of hypoxia.

Hypoxia is one of the most deadly and silent killers that aircrew members, high altitude skydivers, mountain climbers or balloonists can face. Hypoxia is a state of oxygen deficiency in the blood cells and tissue that, if untreated, can cause mental and physical impairment, unconsciousness, or even death.

ASU's College of Technology and Innovation is one of two colleges in the United States that offers altitude chamber training courses related to recognition, treatment and prevention of hypoxia.

Brent Crow, author of the article and the operations manager for the ASU altitude chamber, describes his personal experience of how hypoxia training inside the ASU altitude chamber saved his life during a routine flight from Winslow, Ariz. back to Phoenix-Mesa Gateway Airport. Crow's personal account and subsequent devotion to training pilots and aircrew members at the ASU altitude chamber is captured in his article, "Hypoxia: The Silent Killer" in this month's Cessna Flyer magazine.

Even though experiences like Crow's continue to occur along with more unfortunate stories of pilots without the proper training, hypoxia training is not mandated by the FAA or the Intarnational Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO). 

For more information on hypoxia training, visit: technology.asu.edu/facilities/aviation/altitude-chamber.

Article source:
Cessna Flyer


Editor's Note: Links are included for informational purposes only. Due to varying editorial policies, news publications may remove or change a link for archival purposes at any time without notice.

Jessi Hibsman, Jessi.Hibsman@asu.edu
480-259-9443
Office of the Vice President for Entrepreneurship & Innovation