February 13, 2012

Supernovae: a super lecture topic

Posted: February 13, 2012
X-Rays From Tycho's Supernova Remnant. Unlike some other supernova remnants, no hot central point source can be found, supporting the theory that the origin of this stellar explosion was a runaway nuclear detonation that ultimately destroyed a white dwarf star.
Photo by: NASA/CXC/F.J. Lu (Chinese Academy of Sciences) et al.

Some people hunt fossils, and some hunt for supernovae.

So what are supernovae? Learn about them during a free astronomy lecture and open house Feb. 24, at ASU’s Tempe campus.

The lecture, titled “White Dwarf Supernovae,” will be presented at 7 p.m., in Bateman Physical Sciences Center F-173, by Frank Timmes, a professor in the School of Earth and Space Exploration.

“We'll traverse the frontier of supernova from white dwarf stars by exploring historical yet brand-new supernovae, contributions from amateur supernova hunters, the cyber-enabled state of the art, and near-future $1B NASA missions," Timmes says of his lecture.

The Astronomy Open House, from 8 to 10 p.m., on the roof of Bateman Physical Sciences Center H-Wing, also will have a “Supernova” theme. Visitors will be able to see new high-resolution images of the moon, and look through the telescopes.

To get to the open house, go to the main entrance to the Bateman H-wing. Free parking is available after 7 p.m., in the Tyler Street Parking Garage. From the parking garage go west along the University Drive sidewalk (toward campus) until you see signs leading you to the entrance. 

For a campus map and parking information, visit http://astopenhouse.com, or contact Ashcraft at teresa.ashcraft@asu.edu.

For information on the lecture series, go to http://sese.asu.edu/content/astronomy-public-lecture

Judith Smith, jps@asu.edu
Media Relations