March 30, 2011

Could cancer be our oldest ancestor?

Posted: Mar 30, 2011 | 8 min 36 sec

ASU researcher Paul Davies shares his theory about cancer being our evolutionary ancestor.

Before the Cambrian flowering of multicellular life, there was a period of about a billion years where cells began to get together and form rudimentary colonies, says Davies, director of the BEYOND Center for Fundamental Concepts in Science at ASU and principal investigator of a major research program funded by the National Cancer Institute, who is one of two scientists proposing a theory that suggests cancer cells are living fossils.

"These rudimentary colonies, I think, were like the earliest tumors. So when people get cancer now, these tumors represent a throwback to that time about a billion years ago – that first experimentation with multicellularity," Davies says.  
 

Video Archive

ASU professor and student looking at computer screen
Feb 13, 2014 | 3 min 6 sec
immigration forum
Apr 25, 2013 | 89 min 41 sec
Rebecca Tsosie
Feb 07, 2013 | 3 min 29 sec
Sudhir Kumar
Feb 07, 2013 | 3 min 10 sec
Ron Adrian
Feb 07, 2013 | 3 min 22 sec
ASU Discovers
Oct 24, 2012 | 24 min 19 sec
Picture 3.png
Jul 23, 2009 | 2 min 32 sec
20090721_cronkitemoon.jpg
Jul 21, 2009 | 11 min 57 sec
20090721_cronkitekaet.jpg
Jul 21, 2009 | 10 min 59 sec
20090720_globalresolve.jpg
Jul 20, 2009 | 2 min 20 sec
20090716_moonwalk.jpg
Jul 16, 2009 | 3 min 41 sec
robinson.jpg
Jun 17, 2009 | 1 min 42 sec